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tracesoftexas
(@tracesoftexas)
Honorable Member Admin

Was there ever any doubt as to which music video would be linked here first?   

One time in about 1985 I was at the venerable Scholz Garten in Austin, drinking beer. Scholz had an ancient  .45 record of "Waltz Across Texas"  on the jukebox back then and somebody would get play it approximately  65 times per night, so the record was sort of rough and scratchy. Nobody cared; it simply added to the ambiance. Anyway, I was coming out of the bathroom at the same time the immortal Doug Sahm was strolling in.  Just about that time, "Waltz Across Texas"  came cascading down from the rafters.  As he was entering, Doug stumbled, grabbed my arm,  steadied himself, looked up at me and, with the funniest expression, said "I wish to hell he'd get through waltzin' ... he's been waltzin' for the last 40 years!"  Good times in Austin.   

What a classic song. 

 

 

 

Beauty is only skin deep but Texas is to the bone.

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Posted : 31st March 2019 2:57 pm
tracesoftexas
(@tracesoftexas)
Honorable Member Admin

Ernest Tubb's Wikipedia entry:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernest_Tubb

 

He was born in Crisp, Texas.  I've been to Crisp.  Not much there at all now. 

This post was modified 2 years ago 2 times by tracesoftexas

Beauty is only skin deep but Texas is to the bone.

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Posted : 2nd April 2019 9:55 am
tracesoftexas
(@tracesoftexas)
Honorable Member Admin

It's hard to overestimate the impact of Ernest Tubb's "Walking the Floor Over You"  in 1940.  It was the record that started the whole "honky tonk"  genre of country music.  Here's Ernest singing it in the 1943 movie "Fighting Buckaroo."  As far as I am aware, this is the earliest extant video that we have of Ernest. He was 29 years old at this time.

 

This post was modified 2 years ago by tracesoftexas

Beauty is only skin deep but Texas is to the bone.

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Posted : 2nd April 2019 10:23 am
tracesoftexas
(@tracesoftexas)
Honorable Member Admin

Miscellaneous Ernest Tubb Quotes:

 

"I don't care whether I hit the right note or not. I'm not looking for perfection of delivery ----- thousands of singers have that. I'm looking for individuality."

 

 

"I owe any success I've had to a single strange thing. I've never been able to hold one note longer than one beat, and then it sort of trails off. So all over the country there are guys sitting in bars getting soused and trying to impress their girl. Then my voice comes on the jukebox and they say, 'I can sing better than that guy.' And in about 90% of the cases they're right."

 

----- country music legend Ernest Tubb, 1967, interview with "The Nashville Tennessean"

 

 

This post was modified 2 years ago 3 times by tracesoftexas

Beauty is only skin deep but Texas is to the bone.

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Posted : 3rd January 2020 5:51 pm
tracesoftexas
(@tracesoftexas)
Honorable Member Admin

Ernest Tubb was born on a cotton farm near Crisp (now a ghost town), Texas. His father was a sharecropper, so Tubb spent his youth working on farms throughout the state. Bur Ernest had dreams and, inspired by Jimmie Rodgers, spent his spare time learning to sing, yodel, and play the guitar. At age 19, he took a job as a singer on San Antonio radio station KONO-AM. The pay was low so that Ernest also dug ditches for the Works Progress Administration and then clerked at a drug store. In 1939 he moved to San Angelo, Texas and was hired to do a 15-minute afternoon live show on radio station KGKL-AM. He drove a beer delivery truck in order to support himself during this time, and during World War II he wrote and recorded a song titled "Beautiful San Angelo."

 

In 1936, Tubb contacted Jimmie Rodgers’s widow (Rodgers died in 1933) to ask for an autographed photo. A friendship developed and she was instrumental in getting Tubb a recording contract with RCA. His first two records were unsuccessful. A tonsillectomy in 1939 affected his singing style so he turned to songwriting. In 1940 he switched to Decca records to try singing again and it was his sixth Decca release with the single "Walking the Floor Over You" that brought Tubb to stardom. He joined the Grand Ol' Opry in 1943 and with his band, the Troubadours, stayed for more than 40 years.

Beauty is only skin deep but Texas is to the bone.

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Posted : 7th January 2020 11:15 pm
tracesoftexas
(@tracesoftexas)
Honorable Member Admin

Beauty is only skin deep but Texas is to the bone.

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Posted : 30th June 2021 6:48 pm